We're having a sale. And a ride.

usFrom Friday November 23rd through December 23rd, buy any one item and receive 25% off any 2nd item of equal or lesser value. We’re also temporarily knocking $250 off the cost of a bakfiets. The bakfiets discount doesn’t apply for people participating in the San Francisco free delivery program — that much of a deal might precipitate a singularity in the bike-time-oil-money matrix with unpredictable cosmic repercussions.

On Friday the 23rd, at noon, come join us for an easy ride around the neighborhood. Very family friendly.

Happy Thanksgiving, friends. We are thankful for your patronage and warm support of our new enterprise.

26 thoughts on “We're having a sale. And a ride.”

  • Ian Hopper

    Oh, I wish I could bring the Azor up for the ride... such a shame that Portland is so far from SF. Happy Thanksgiving CleverFamily!

    Reply
  • Bruce A. Wilson

    Has anyone here seen this film: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0009L4AA6/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top ?

    If you have you may recall that at least one of the group was on an Xtracycle; I have been told that the X-cycle people got lots of inquiries and a few sales after this film came out.

    How about persuading some group doing a cross-country ride to include a BF in the group? A documentary, or even an article in some magazine like Adventure Cycling might stimulate interest.

    Reply
  • Mike C

    include a BF in the group?

    Acronym collision alert: In certain bicycling circles, including but not limited to Pacific Northwest bicycling circles, BF already means something else: http://bikefriday.com/

    Reply
  • Bruce A. Wilson
    Bruce A. Wilson December 3, 2007 at 5:46 am

    I stumbled across this video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hAvHDaffU7s

    Does anyone know if this is something this guy bodged up for himself, or is it a commercial product? If the latter, is it available on this side of the pond?

    Reply
  • graham

    Some details in Dutch ( of course )
    http://www.camptrailer.nl
    The website was on the side of the trailer.
    It appears to be, simply, a very light trailer
    modified to hitch on a recumbent tricycle.

    Reply
  • Andy B from Jersey
    Andy B from Jersey December 3, 2007 at 2:32 pm

    Uhhh.... Ummm.... About the Camptrailer?
    A tent is much easier, lighter and smaller to pack and can give you more room if you so desire. Sorry for having to state the obvious.

    Reply
  • Andy B from Jersey
    Andy B from Jersey December 3, 2007 at 2:45 pm

    Oh yeah! One other thing. My friend and I have been wondering if I buy the Bakfiet from the shop in Philly, how would I get it home? I could borrow my brothers truck for the trip from the shop to my house or........

    Talk about trial by Bak! I've done my fair share of bike touring in my time but it sure would be interesting to try and ride the thing home for 60 miles right after purchasing it. Not too many big hills between Philly and central Jersey, its more a matter of finding a decent route to avoid dangerous traffic and dangerous neighborhoods. Also the other question is do I try and ride it all in one day or two? Do I camp (which I love) but would put me out of the way to go to a camp site or do I stay at a friends house halfway in Trenton?

    First I would need to get the job so I can get the Bak but I'm really considering doing this. Has anyone else tried riding one home a significant distance sans electromechanical assistance??

    Reply
  • AllanF

    I haven't ridden mine a significant distance, probably 10 round-trip miles is the most. But I can tell you the stock saddle is not up to the task. If you are taller than about 5'10", the cockpit would get very cramped after an hour (and 4-5 to go). I also think the small cranks would get tiresome, but YMMV. Probably depends on one's riding style and whether one can get into the Zen of the fiets. I'd definitely plan for doing it in two days. If nothing else, it'd be twice the fun.

    Reply
  • Todd (admin)

    Small cranks, Allan? They're 170s. Agreed that the stock saddle is too poofy for more than short hops. I know of one 50-mile bakfiets day (with 2 kids!), by a novice who rented one of ours for Bridge Pedal, and who lived out in the 100's. That was impressive. I've done a 35 mile day, yes cheating with electric, but I could have pulled it off without.

    I don't think bakfietsen are all that great as touring rigs. Possible? Sure.

    Reply
  • Andy B from Jersey
    Andy B from Jersey December 4, 2007 at 5:40 am

    Yeah, I'd buy the Bak with a Brooks and once I got the Bak I wouldn't be looking sell my Indy Fab MTB that I set up for road/off-road touring any time soon. Under most circumstances I wouldn't really be looking to do more with the Bak than to run errands and to take my 77yo mom for a ride once in a while (Thanks for the idea).

    In fact that is one of the big reasons why I now want to get a Bak, so I can share the joy of riding a bike with my mom. Don't forget from earlier posts that she used to be the one who would bomb down the bombed out roads of postwar Germany on her singlespeed coaster-brake town bike till the coaster brake sizzled. She loves bikes but is too afraid to ride on her own now. The Bak is the ticket to get her back on two wheels!

    Reply
  • AllanF

    I stand corrected on the cranks. I guess the cramped cockpit makes them feel smaller than reality. Maybe for Christmas I'll get that clever seat-post extender I've seen pictures of.

    As for Bak-touring, I think more than anything it's the hills. Going up hills with a loaded Bak is what takes it out of me. 70lbs of bike plus another 70lbs of kids & gear is a lot to lug up a hill.

    Reply
  • Mike C

    @Andy B: Not sure if you know about these, but for route suggestions, check out http://www.njbikemap.com/njmap/maplocation.htm
    I used them to augment the Adventure Cycling Association map when I cycled from NYC to Philly (ok, actually Newark to Yardley, PA) a few years ago for Trophy Bike's annual Round-Up. Somebody put a lot of time & effort into these and I found them highly useful.

    Regarding riding a new Bak home: dude, you gotta do it! and take pictures! and blog about it! Take NJTransit/Septa into the city, buy that BF, and pedal 'er home, swathed in honor and triumph!! The game is to the bold!

    Also, Trophy Bikes rocks - one of the better shops in the Northeast, IMHO.

    Reply
  • Mike C

    ALso, I just contradicted what I said last week (top of thread) about how "BF" should mean "Bike Friday", not "bakfiets".

    I'm going to stop commenting and go back to work now.

    Reply
  • Andy B from Jersey
    Andy B from Jersey December 4, 2007 at 8:28 am

    Yeah I know about the NJBikeMap but I really don't find it all that useful despite the epic amount of labor that must have gone into it. I don't find the street evaluations all that accurate nor the key descriptions useful. Some of the roads that get a "green" rating are death traps and ones that get a "red" rating are actually quite safe for experienced cyclists. Green I gather means scenic country road despite the heavy traffic volumes, narrow width and lack of shoulders in many cases. If you think that scenery trumps safety, by all means use his maps.

    Plus the guy didn't include bike shops on the maps but included race car tracks?? Huhh? WTFunk?

    Plus hey! I'm Andy B from Jersey! I know just about all of NJ's back roads and trails. I don't need no stinking maps! Anyway half the fun has always been getting a bit lost on a little road that you've never been on before and then finding your way home! Pennsylvania however, is whole other story.

    Like I said before if I get the good job I applied for then I'll worry about this. The job would start in January so the next question is, do I buy it in the Winter and take it home by truck or just wait till the weather gets warm and do it in the Spring. I'm not gonna' do it in the Winter unless we have some wacky warm weather. Don't worry. If I do do it (and I really, really want to), there with be plenty of pictures and blogging.

    Reply
  • Mike C

    Interesting... my experience with NJBikeMaps.com was admittedly limited to that one time (and I haven't biked in NJ much apart from Hudson & Bergen counties). The printouts were useful for stitching together a route that started with the Adventure Cycling route out of NYC (hence the PATH to Newark) and then diverted to the D&R canal path from New Brunswick to Trenton.

    For getting back out of Philly, I had a free(? - can't remember) map of the state (or at least the eastern portion) that I picked up somewhere (maybe at Trophy?) that showed recommended on- and off-road cycling routes. If I remember I'll look for it when I get home to see who published it.

    Reply
  • Andy B from Jersey
    Andy B from Jersey December 5, 2007 at 5:30 am

    I've got that map already so don't worry. It's printed by the Greater Philly Bike Coalition or at least with their help.
    And now that we've turn this Blog entry into our own personal conversation lets try to get it back on some other track.

    Reply
  • Bruce A. Wilson
    Bruce A. Wilson December 5, 2007 at 5:40 am

    "If you are taller than about 5’10”, the cockpit would get very cramped after an hour (and 4-5 to go)."

    Hmmm. I'm 6'1"; does that mean that I'm too big for a Bak?

    Reply
  • Andy B from Jersey
    Andy B from Jersey December 5, 2007 at 6:07 am

    Yeah it does seem odd that a country of very tall people would produce a bike that would be a little cramped for taller people. On another thread I talked about how I felt cramped when I took one for a test ride but Todd said that the handlebars are placed where they are so they don't hit the heads of passengers sitting in the basket. Still you would hope that they would have addressed this right from the start of the bike's design.

    Reply
  • Todd (admin)

    Dutch midgets are 6'1". I disagree that it gets unusably short at 5'10" or 6'6" -- the seat angle is much slacker than the head so they move apart as you raise them. But see comments here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cleverchimp/1429704016/ . The bakfiets was indeed designed with a longer cockpit, but that feature fell out of production. Meanwhile, understand that the cockpit is still typical of nearly all Dutch utility bikes, which is to say short.

    Reply
  • Bruce A. Wilson
    Bruce A. Wilson December 5, 2007 at 6:36 am

    Todd, may I ask how tall are YOU? The pictures of you on the bike make you look a respectable height, but it is hard to tell.

    Reply
  • Todd (admin)

    I'm a tad under 6'11", at least upon waking. More than a tad at the end of a long day. I think this is sort of a silly conversation, because cockpit length isn't as critical on a bike where you're sitting bolt upright as it is on one where your arms are loaded and your torso inclined forward. And yes, the Dutch are very, very tall: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/316/7149/1929/b

    Reply
  • Bruce A. Wilson

    I notice that your link to the BMJ says that in spite of all the cycling the Dutch are getting fatter.

    I also note that the Dutch increase in height is attributed in part to their high-dairy diet. That's one for the Vegans.

    Reply
  • AllanF

    To be clear, my comment was entirely aimed at *touring* and the long, continuous hours such entails. No one should read that as meaning the Bakfeits are for short people. Or are not awesome bikes for their intended purpose: around town, kid and cargo hauling.

    Further, my experience with long periods in the Bak is that my arms and elbows begin to tire and ache. Probably it's me. Probably I need to chill and ride a touch slower. Probably I need to remember to raise the seat from where my wife leaves it. Whatever. I don't think an experienced rider with 60 miles in front of him is going to lolly-gag, but again, whatever. My original statement did include the qualifier "depends on one’s riding style and whether one can get into the Zen of the fiets." I stand by that. "YMMV." I stand by that too.

    Reply
  • Bruce A. Wilson
    Bruce A. Wilson December 6, 2007 at 6:42 am

    Getting back to my idea of insinuating a BAK (not BF so as to prevent confusion; especially as it can also mean 'boyfriend') into a transcontinental ride, what modifications would you put on one to make it more comfortable for touring? I still think that such a project would be good for increasing the BAK's profile.

    Reply
  • Todd (admin)

    I wouldn't do it, Bruce. It's too heavy, carries far too much, doesn't make good use of your upper body muscles, has poor aerodynamics for the plains, has too narrow a gear range, and the braking isn't up to crossing several mountain ranges. As a stunt, you could do it. And the point of the stunt would be that you don't understand what a bakfiets is good for relative to proper purpose-built touring bikes. We have many other fish to fry. Maybe a trans-Holland trip. It's probably been done several times already and nobody noticed, which is as it should be.

    I'd like to ask that comments on this here blog have more than a tangential relevance to the posts to which they are appended. It's just not a good use of network resources and people's time to turn every post about specific bikes into a freewheeling forum about all kinds of other unfamiliar bikes and their capabilities. Bikeforums.net is a good place for such discussions.

    Reply
  • Bruce Alan Wilson
    Bruce Alan Wilson December 6, 2007 at 12:29 pm

    Points taken anent the BAK's unsuitability for transcontinental touring.

    What,then, would be a good way to raise consciousness about the BAK?

    Reply
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